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Tamay Özgökmen

Professor
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
tozgokmen@rsmas.miami.edu

Tamay Özgökmen is the Director of the CARTHE Consortium. He has authored more than 60 peer-reviewed publications on oceanic turbulence and transport. He is also the co-editor of a pioneering book on Lagrangian Ocean Transport. Dr. Özgökmen has played a key role in several large multi-institutional research projects including The Climate Process Team on Gravity Current Entrainment, which was a major collaboration between university investigators and climate center researchers. Presently Dr. Özgökmen is a member of ONR's Lateral Mixing science team, and an investigator in ONR Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative on Dynamical systems theory in 4D geophysical fluid dynamics (http://www.whoi.edu/ocean3dplus1/).

Hamidreza Arabshahi

Ph.D. Student
University of Texas
Institute for Computational Engineering and Science
hamarabshahi@gmail.com


Kimberly Arnott

Postdoctoral Research Associate
Texas A&M University
Physical and Environmental Sciences Department
Kimberly.Arnott@tamucc.edu

Kimberly is a postdoctoral research associate who is working with Darek Bogucki in the Physical and Environmental Sciences Department at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. She graduated from the University of Florida in May 2013, where she studied mixing in estuaries. Her recent work explores internal wave induced surface transport and near-surface turbulent dissipation.

Roy Barkan

Post-Doctoral Research Associate
University of California, Los Angeles

rbarkan@ucsd.edu


Brad Benggio


NOAA




Francisco Beron-Vera

Research Associate Professor
University of Miami
Applied Marine Physics
fberon@rsmas.miami.edu

Francisco Beron-Vera's experience includes application of modern ideas from dynamical systems theory to the study of transport and mixing in geophysical flows. These modern ideas gave birth to the notion of Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS), which is at the heart of the oil spill problem. He has published more than fifteen papers on these topics. These papers include three papers dealing specifically with transport and mixing in the Gulf of Mexico, and one invited contribution to the Chaos journal Focus Issue on "Lagrangian coherent structures in fluid flows." He also coauthors with George Haller (McGill University) the recently developed geodesic theory of LCSs in two-dimensional flows. In a unified manner, the geodesic theory enables uncovering all the LCS types that compose the Lagrangian skeleton underlying fluid flow: hyperbolic LCSs (centerpieces of stretching and folding) and shear LCSs (e.g., jet-like transport barriers and eddy boundaries). Additionally, Beron-Vera has chaired the Lorentz Center workshop on "Coherent structures in dynamical systems" ( http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2011/445/info.php3?wsid=445), a unique event that brought together worldwide leaders in LCS theory.

Maristella Berta

Postodoctoral Research Associate
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche
Istituto di Scienze Marine
maristella.berta@sp.ismar.cnr.it

Maristella is a postdoctoral research associate who is working with Annalisa Griffa at the Institute of Marine Science of the National Research Council in La Spezia (Italy). She holds a Master in Environmental Physics (Univ. of Torino) and she received her PhD in Environmental and Industrial Fluid Mechanics at the Univ. of Trieste where she studied Lagrangian transport and connectivity through FSLE technique. Her recent work is focused on the blending of drifter data with sea surface current maps to enhance pollutant transport estimates.

Abigail Bodner

Grad Student
Brown University
Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences



Darek Bogucki

Assistant Professor
Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi
College of Science and Engineering - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences
Darek.Bogucki@tamucc.edu

Darek Bogucki is experienced with near-surface ocean turbulence measurements, surface wave observations, and dye dispersion and DNS/LES simulations of ocean flows. He has more than five peer-reviewed publications on dispersion and turbulence measurements and theory. His group is currently completing ONR- funded work on using Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) for near-surface turbulence measurements.

Michel Boufadel

Professor
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Civil and Environmental Engineering
michel.boufadel@njit.edu

Michel Boufadel is a Professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He was one of the academicians recruited by the Unified Command to address the Deepwater Horizon spill. He also developed remediation technologies for the Exxon Valdez oil spill and implemented them in the field. He has been working on oil spills for the last 20 years and maintains close ties with the US and international government agencies, as well as the American Petroleum Institute.

Annalisa Bracco

Professor
Georgia Institute of Technology
Oceanography
abracco@gatech.edu

Annalisa Bracco is a Professor in Oceanography at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Ph.D. from University of Genoa, advisor A. Provenzale). She has authored over 50 peer-reviewed publica- tions on physical oceanography, climate, and fluid dynamics. She received the AMS 2011 Nicholas Fofonoff Award for contributions to understanding mesoscale ocean dynamics, geostrophic turbu- lence, and tropical dynamics, and their coupling with marine ecosystems.

Laura Bracken

Outreach Manager
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
lbracken@rsmas.miami.edu

Laura Bracken, CARTHE Outreach Manager, works to increase the visibility of CARTHE, inspire young scientists, and bring awareness to environmental issues through innovative educational programs for all ages. Laura was the Outreach Manager for the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School and RJ Dunlap Program for over 5 years, developing unique programs and engaging new audiences. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the Pennsylvania State University and a Master of Arts degree in Marine Affairs & Policy from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School.

Victoria Broje


Shell Exploration & Production Company




Daniel F. Carlson

Postodoctoral Research Associate
Florida State University
Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science


Daniel F. Carlson recently completed his Ph.D. at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he studied internal waves and mixing in the Gulf of Eilat (Red Sea). Dr. Carlson is experienced in coastal and deep ocean observations, scientific technical diving, and remote sensing. In 2007, he was awarded a Fulbright Student grant to study surface currents in the Gulf of Eilat at the Weizmann Institute of Science with Prof. Hezi Gildor.

Shuyi Chen

Professor
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
schen@rsmas.miami.edu

Shuyi Chen is CARTHE's group leader for atmosphere/wave modeling. Dr. Chen has more than 50 publications on fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling, air-sea interaction, and tropical cyclone observation and modeling. She has been a lead PI for recent major field campaigns of tropical cyclones including the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST, ONR), the Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Experiment (RAINEX, NSF), and the Impact of Typhoon on Ocean in Pacific (ITOP, ONR). She is a lead PI for the National Ocean Partnership Program (NOPP) coupled modeling science team to develop an unified air-sea coupled model for the next-generation hurricane research and prediction.

Sharon Chinchilla

Program Manager
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
schinchilla@rsmas.miami.edu

Sharon Chinchilla is CARTHE's Program Manager. She previously worked as an Environmental Scientist and has several years of experience working in a science-based, academic setting. She holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in Environmental Science from Nova Southeastern University and is currently a graduate student in the Marine Affairs and Policy program at the University of Miami.

Jun Choi

Ph.D. Student
Purdue University

choi136@purdue.edu


Darin Comeau

Alumnus
University of Arizona
Department of Mathematics
dcomeau@math.arizona.edu

Darin Comeau has recently finished his Ph.D. degree at the University of Arizona. He is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University.

Cortis Cooper


Chevron Energy Technology Company




Valerie Cruz

Master's Level Student
University of Southern MIssissippi
Department of Science
valerie.cruz@eagles.usm.edu


Milan Curcic

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
mcurcic@rsmas.miami.edu


Rosemary Cyriac

Ph.D. Student
North Carolina State University
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
rcyriac@ncsu.edu


Eric D'Asaro

Professor
University of Washington
Applied Physics Laboratory
dasaro@apl.uw.edu

Eric A. D’Asaro, Oceanographer and Professor, University of Washington since 1994 (B.A., M.S. Harvard University, Ph.D. MIT/WHOI) is an author on 93 peer-reviewed publications and the holder of the 2011 Sverdrup Gold Medal from the American Meteorological Society. His work includes the dynamics of the upper ocean boundary, internal waves and their role in controlling biochemical processes in the ocean, especially gas exchange and biological productivity. He recently became a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Stuart Dalziel

Reader in Fluid Mechanics and the Director of the GK Batchelor Laboratory
University of Cambridge
Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
s.dalziel@damtp.cam.ac.uk

Stuart Dalziel is a Reader in Fluid Mechanics and the Director of the GK Batchelor Labo- ratory at the University of Cambridge. His research spans industrial and environmental problems, with a particular focus on stratified flows. He has over 60 journal articles including studies of plumes, gravity currents, and mixing in both single- and multi-phase contexts.

Clint Dawson

Professor
University of Texas
Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
clint@ices.utexas.edu

Clint Dawson is CARTHE's group leader for coastal modelling. Dr. Dawson has more than 20 years of experience in numerical studies of coastal ocean transport processes, focusing on two and three dimensional wave, current, and transport models. He is part of the development team for the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model, with numerous applications to modeling Gulf of Mexico hurricane response since 2000. He was awarded NSF RAPID and DHS grants to model the Deepwater Horizon oil spill using ADCIRC and a newly developed Lagrangian particle tracking code. Dr. Dawson has ten peer-reviewed papers on shallow water modeling, with emphasis on hurricane storm surge in the Gulf of Mexico. He is currently head of the Computational Hydraulics Group in the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at UT Austin.

Cayla Dean

Research Staff
Nova Southeastern University
Oceanographic Center
cd821@nova.edu


Bruno Deremble

Research Staff
Florida State University
Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
bderemble@fsu.edu


William Dewar

Professor
Florida State University
Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
dewar@ocean.fsu.edu

William Dewar is experienced in regional ocean modeling and downscaling, with an emphasis on interactions with complex topography and air-sea interactions. He is also experienced the application of theoretical fluid dynamics to realistic ocean simulations. He has published work on the role of topographic anomalies in the ocean and explored the catalytic role of topography in generating submesoscale structures. Dr. Dewar is the lead investigator on a multi-institutional NSF-funded earth systems modeling effort to understand and remove the causes of biases in climate models.

Casey Dietrich

Assistant Professor
North Carolina State University
Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
jcdietrich@ncsu.edu

Casey Dietrich is an Assistant Professor in the Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering Department at North Carolina State University. His research focus is on the computational modeling of coastal hazards, including hurricane waves and storm surge along the Gulf coast. These models have been used for levee design by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and for floodplain risk assessment by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He has also applied these models in an operational framework to forecast oil transport following the BP spill in 2010.

Daniel Espinal

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Aerospace Engineering
dan_espinal@hotmail.com


Alexandre Fabregat

Postodoctoral Research Associate
City University of New York
Department of Mathematics
fabregat.alex@gmail.com

After obtaining his Ph.D. at the Mechanical Engineering Department (Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain), he moved to Ottawa (Canada) where he worked with Spectral Element Methods (SEM) for CFD applications. As a member of CARTHE and the Mathematics Department at City University of New York, his main interest is using SEM tools to study the turbulent heat and mass transfer in the context of oceanography. His primary research goal is to develop and implement models that allow us to shed some light on the dynamics of multiphase flows associated to oil/gas plumes resulting from oil spills in the deep ocean.

Paul Fischer

Professor
University of Illinois
Mechanical Science and Engineering
fischerp@illinois.edu

Paul Fischer is a Professor at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from M.I.T., M.S. from Stanford, and B.S. from Cornell). He was the first recipient of the Center for Research in Parallel Computation prize fellowship at CalTech. Fischer is a recipient of the Gordon Bell Prize for high-performance computing and has published over 120 articles in the area, including a book on high-order numerical methods for flow simulation. He wrote the first commercially available software for distributed memory parallel computers. His open source spectral element code, Nek5000, is used for fluid dynamics and combustion simulation by more than 200 researchers worldwide and has scaled to over a million processors.

Baylor Fox-Kemper

Assistant Professor
Brown University
Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences
baylor@brown.edu

Baylor Fox-Kemper is an Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences at Brown University (Ph.D. from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program, advised by J. Pedlosky). He has authored over 33 peer-reviewed publications on physical oceanography, climate, scientific computing, and fluid mechanics. He received a 2014 NSF CAREER award and the 2011 AGU Ocean Sciences Early Career Award for “fundamental contributions to understanding the oceanic general circulation, the dynamical nature of the eddy-filled oceanic mixed layer, and their connection to climate modeling.”

Matthew Gough

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Applied Marine Physics
mgough@rsmas.miami.edu


Austin J. Gould


U.S. Coast Guard




Annalisa Griffa

Senior Scientist
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche
Istituto di Scienze Marine
annalisa.griffa@ismar.cnr.it

Annalisa Griffa is a Senior Scientist at Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), La Spezia Italy. She is an expert on ocean transport, Lagrangian data analysis and assimilation, and author of more than 70 peer reviewed articles on these subjects. She has a leading role in a number of European projects on transport prediction to improve response to marine accidents, is responsible of the Italian HF radar network in the RITMARE project.

Kim Grinfeder

Director of New Media, Knight Center For International Media
University of Miami
School of Communication
grinfeder@miami.edu

Kim Grinfeder teaches web design at the University of Miami Interactive Media Program. His research interests include interaction design and multimedia storytelling. His professional background includes positions in design, programming, and new media consulting.

Cedric Guigand

Senior Research Associate II
University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
cguigand@rsmas.miami.edu

After earning a Master of Science in Marine Biology in 2002 at Florida Tech, Cedric started working at RSMAS. Even though his background is in fish functional morphology, he has personal interests in new technologies and engineering, which allow him to understand the technical needs of field research and propose new approaches to answer scientific questions. Cedric's main contribution to the research done in this laboratory is problem solving and design of new field sampling instruments and lab experimental systems.

Ali Habashi

Director, Arnold Center Confluent Media Studies/Adjunct Faculty
University of Miami
School of Communication
ahabashi@miami.edu

Ali Habashi is the production team lead for the CARTHE film. He is an award winning documentary filmmaker, the Director of Arnold Center Confluent Media Studies and an adjunct faculty member for the Department of Cinema and Interactive Media at the University of Miami. Filming stories in more than 30 countries, his documentary work has been featured in NBC6 and USA Today and aired on international Cable and Public TV channels such as Discovery (US and India), Canal+(France), CZTV (Czech Republic), LAPTV (Latin America) and CNN Türk. Specific area experience includes films on science communication as well as environmental and social issues such as access to clean drinking water and sanitation, aging in 21st century, potential implications of increasing the human life/health span on population, resources, generational succession and the healthcare system.

Bryan Hamilton

Master's Level Student
Nova Southeastern University
Oceanographic Center
bh755@nova.edu


Ramsey Harcourt

Principal Oceanographer
University of Washington
Applied Physics Laboratory
harcourt@apl.washington.edu

Ramsey R. Harcourt is a Principal Oceanographer at the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from Univ. of California, Santa Cruz in 1999. His research interests include large eddy simulation, second moment closures, wave and ice boundary layers, deep convection, submesoscale turbulence and the response of buoyant particles, bubbles and oil to boundary-layer turbulence.

Brian Haus

Associate Professor and Chair
University of Miami
Applied Marine Physics
bhaus@rsmas.miami.edu

Brian Haus is CARTHE's group leader in observational and experimental studies. Dr. Haus has extensive experience in experimental studies of coastal ocean surface currents; radar remote sensing of oceanographic processes; shelf and estuary dynamics; wave-current interactions; sediment transport and air-sea interactions. His research focuses on laboratory studies of air-sea interactions and turbulence in the ASIST laboratory and in the Surge-Structure-Atmosphere Interaction (SUSTAIN) facility which is presently under construction.

Peter Haynes

Professor
University of Cambridge
Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
phh@damtp.cam.ac.uk

Peter Haynes is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He is a Member of Academia Europaea (since 1998). He has 29 years of experience of research since completing his Ph.D. in 1984. His research is in fluid dynamics and its role in the atmosphere and ocean, including interactions with physical, chemical, and biological processes.

Angelique Haza

Associate Scientist
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
ahaza@rsmas.miami.edu

Angelique Haza is an experienced researcher in the application of Lagrangian dynamical systems methods to estimate the ocean's scale-dependent relative dispersion, and to develop optimal drifter launch strategies. She is also experienced with parameterizing subgridscale motions using Lagrangian sub-grid scale (LSGS) models.

Christopher N. Hill

Principal Research Engineer
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate
cnh@mit.edu

Chris Hill is a principal researcher at M.I.T. He is a lead architect of the M.I.T. General Circulation Model (MITgcm), a globally used research model that has generated many thousands of publications. Hill’s work on the MITgcm pioneered connecting non-hydrostatic fluid dynamics to large-scale circulation. The methods developed have been adopted in the design of several next generation atmospheric and ocean models from national centers in the USA, Europe, and Asia.

Kalypso Homan

High School Student
Lutcher High School




M. Ani Hsieh

Associate Professor
Drexel University
Mechanical Engineering & Mechanics
mhsieh1@drexel.edu

M. Ani Hsieh is an Associate Professor at Drexel University (Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007). Hsieh is an expert in the distributed control and coordination of multi-agent robotic systems. Her current efforts include the development of dis- tributed mapping and tracking of Lagrangian coherent structures by teams of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. She is the recipient of a 2012 ONR Young Investigator Award and a 2013 NSF CAREER Award.

Helga Huntley

Assistant Research Professor
University of Delaware
Physical Ocean Science and Engineering
helgah@udel.edu

Helga Huntley is an Assistant Research Professor with the University of Delaware. She trained as an applied mathematician and has been tackling problems in oceanography and atmospheric science since graduate school. Within CARTHE, she studies transport patterns in the Gulf of Mexico, their predictability and how best to use models of different scales to piece the patterns together. Some of her other research efforts are focused on data assimilation, sea ice dynamics and ocean process studies.

Mohamed Iskandarani

Associate Professor
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
miskandarani@rsmas.miami.edu

Mohamed Iskandarani is CARTHE's group leader on uncertainty analysis. Dr. Iskandarani has established a long track record in developing, running, and analyzing large-scale ocean models, with emphasis on the GoM. He is experienced in high-performance computing, data-sharing and data-mining of large datasets in collaborative, networked environments.

Bert Jagers

Technical Coordinator
Deltares
Software Development
bert.jagers@deltares.nl

Bert Jagers is a senior researcher at Deltares, Delft, the Netherlands. He has wide expertise in sediment transport and morphology, numerical modelling, model coupling and data standardization. He has a leading role in 1D, 2D and 3D model development including Delft3D. Bert is co-PI on a European project on the development of a distributed cyber-infrastructure for hydro-meteorology. He is member of the steering committee of the NSF-funded Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and member of the executive committee of the OpenMI Association for international standardization of model coupling interfaces.

Denny Kirwan

Professor
University of Delaware
Physical Ocean Science and Engineering
adk@udel.edu

Denny Kirwan is a Marine Studies Professor at the University of Delaware. Since obtaining his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 1964, he has served as a faculty member at five different universities. He has also worked as a research scientist at two private sector companies and as a Program Manager for the Office of Naval Research. Dr. Kirwan has always been very interested in fluid transport in the environment. In the mid 1970’s, he was privileged enough to have participated in the first large-scale Lagrangian deployment of satellite-tracked drifters in oceanography and has since been involved in numerous Lagrangian experiments. The data obtained during these experiments has helped him study the transfer of material and energy between different scales. His talent and extensive experience are great assets to CARTHE, where he is currently collaborating on the data analysis of the GLAD experiment.

Omar Knio

Professor
Duke University
Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
omar.knio@duke.edu

Omar Knio is Edmund T. Pratt, Jr., Professor at Duke University. Prof. Knio combines expertise in the design of numerical methods and their application to problems in fluid dynamics and geophysical flows, as well as the design of uncertainty quantification methods, algorithms and software, and the application of these capabilities to uncertainty propagation, sensitivity analysis, Bayesian inference, model selection, and inverse problems. Dr. Knio currently serves on the Editorial Boards of Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics, of ISRN Applied Mathematics, and of SIAM/ASA Journal on Uncertainty Quantification. He has co-authored over 100 journal papers, two books, and is an inventor on 12 patents.

Joanna Kolasinski

Postdoctoral Fellow
University of South Florida
College of Marine Science / Geological Oceanography
jkolasinski@mail.usf.edu

Joanna Kolasinski is a marine biologist and has experience in stable isotopes to investigate oceanic and coastal biogeochemical processes. Her recent work focused on the influence of tropical mesoscale eddies in biological production and coastal ecosystems facing global change using a combination of tools (stable isotopes, community metrics, ecotoxicology,). She is currently a post-doctoral researcher at Tulane University.

Naoko Kurata

Master's Level Student
Nova Southeastern University
Oceanographic Center
kurata@nova.edu


Julien Landel

Post-Doctoral Research Associate
University of Cambridge
Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
J.Landel@damtp.cam.ac.uk

Julien Landel is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate in the Department of Applied Mathemat- ics and Theoretical Physics and Junior Research Fellow of Magdalene College at the University of Cambridge. He received a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Churchill College at the University of Cambridge for studies of the transport, dispersion, and mixing properties of confined turbulent jets and was selected as a Finalist for the Osborne Reynolds Research Student Award.

Lucas Laurindo

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
LLaurindo@rsmas.miami.edu


Nathan Laxague

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Applied Marine Physics
nlaxague@rsmas.miami.edu


Fabio Leke

PhD Student
Texas A&M University
Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences
fabioleke@gmail.com


Qing Li

Grad Student
Brown University
Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences
qing_li_1@brown.edu


Paul Linden

Professor
University of Cambridge
Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
P.F.Linden@damtp..cam.ac.uk

Paul Linden is the G. I. Taylor Professor of Fluid Mechanics in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and Professorial Fellow of Downing College, University of Cambridge, and the Blasker Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science and En- gineering in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Royal Meteorological Society, and the Royal Society.

Bruce Lipphardt

Associate Research Professor
University of Delaware
Marine Science and Policy
brucel@udel.edu

Bruce is an Associate Research Professor in the University of Delaware's School of Marine Science and Policy. He is also the lead investigator for the Delaware Bay high-frequency radar network. After receiving his B.Sc. degree in oceanography from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1984, he spent six years onactive duty as a U.S. Navy submarine officer. He received his Ph.D. in physical oceanography at Old Dominion University in 1995. Bruce's research focuses on understanding and quantifying the impact of mesoscale and sub-mesoscale processes on ocean transport, using both observations and models. In recent years, his research group has focused on applying Lagrangian analysis and dynamical systems tools to study ocean circulation and transport problems. Bruce is also CARTHE's data manager.

Jamie MacMahan

Associate Professor
Naval Postgraduate School
Department of Oceanography
jhmacmah@nps.edu

Jamie MacMahan is experienced in nearshore observations using state-of-the-art Eulerian and Lagrangian instrumentation, participating in more than 20 field experiments. He collaborates with Dr. A. Reniers (RSMAS), combining field observations with numerical models. He has published 20 peer-reviewed papers on nearshore processes, mixing, and cross-shore exchange.

Arthur Mariano

Professor
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
amariano@rsmas.miami.edu

Arthur Mariano is CARTHE's group leader in outreach. Dr. Mariano has analyzed, predicted, and assimilated Lagrangian ocean data since his days as a graduate student. He is working on applying nonlinear particle filters (a state-of-the-art technique for fusing Lagrangian information) to flows in the Gulf of Mexico. He is the co-founder and co-organizer of the Lagrangian Analysis and Prediction of Coastal and Ocean Dynamics (LAPCOD) group and has co-authored more than 30 papers and book chapters related to Lagrangian analysis, the Florida Straits, and the Gulf of Mexico, as well as over 40 other peer-reviewed publications. In addition to his work with the University of Miami, he is the chair of the NASA Sea Surface Temperature Science Team Sampling and Analysis Working Group.

James C. McWilliams

Professor
University of California, Los Angeles
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
jcm@atmos.ucla.edu

James C. McWilliams is a geophysical fluid dynamicist who specializes in oceanic circulation and modeling. His college degrees are in applied mathematics at CalTech (1968) and Harvard (1969, 1971). His employment has been at Harvard, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and UCLA, where he is the Louis Slichter Professor of Earth Sciences. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Sanchit Mehta

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami

mehta.sanchit@gmail.com


Jean Mensa

Postdoctoral Research Associate
Yale University
Geology & Geophysics
jean.mensa@yale.edu

Jean is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Yale University in the Geology and Geophysics department. He obtained his PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Miami RSMAS where he worked on numerical simulations of submesoscale and upper ocean dynamics. He now works with Mary-Louise Timmermans on upper ocean dynamics in the Arctic Ocean.

Jeroen Molemaker

Associate Research Professor
University of California, Los Angeles
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
nmolem@atmos.ucla.edu

M. Jeroen Molemaker is an Associate Research Professor at UCLA (Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, with Dr. H.A. Dijkstra and Dr. W.P.M. de Ruijter as co-advisers). With Professor McWilliams, he has pioneered in the study of sub-mesoscale flows in oceanography. The realistic, high-resolutions simulation that are computed at UCLA have changed the way people perceive dynamics at scales below the mesoscale. In ad- dition to numerical simulations of sub-mesoscale flow, Dr. Molemaker has, together with Dr. B. Baschek pioneered a coordinated set of observational platforms that are dedicated to observing submesoscales.

Tim Nedwed


ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company




Guillaume Novelli

Postdoctoral Fellow
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
gnovelli@rsmas.miami.edu

Guillaume Novelli is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Miami, working with Tamay Özgökmen. He has obtained his PhD at Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona, Spain). Dr. Novelli has developed and extensively applied SIMOIL, an Eulerian model of oil spill fate and trajectory in coastal areas.

Josefina Olascoaga

Associate Professor
University of Miami
Applied Marine Physics
jolascoaga@rsmas.miami.edu

Josefina Olascoaga has extensive experience in applying dynamical systems techniques to study ocean transport and mixing. The main focus of her work is in the identification of key material surfaces, broadly known as Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs), which shape global transport and mixing patterns. She has published more than fifteen papers dealing with LCSs. These papers include five papers concerning transport and mixing in the Gulf of Mexico. Olascoaga has been co-organizer of the Lorentz Center workshop on "Coherent structures in dynamical systems", which brought together experts on LCS theory. She is currently member of the organizing committee of the 2013 SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamical Systems. She has been co-convener for several times of the EGU General Assembly Session "Mixing, diffusion and Lagrangian transport in geophysical flows."

Jenna Palmer

Grad Student
Brown University
Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences



Andrew Poje

Professor
City University of New York
Department of Mathematics
poje@math.csi.cuny.edu

Andrew C. Poje has extensive experience in developing and applying evolving mathematical techniques to study ocean transport processes. He has authored and co-authored numerous publications in numerical analysis, turbulent and Lagrangian coherent structure dynamics, dynamical systems theory and advective-diffusive transport problems. Three publications specifically address transport in the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Poje has been an investigator on several ONR and NSF multi-institutional collaborations, including several projects linking mathematicians and oceanographers.

Ad Reniers

Professor
Delft University of Technology
Civil Engineering and Geosciences
A.J.H.M.Reniers@tudelft.nl

A.J.H.M. Reniers is a Professor at Delft University of Technology (Ph.D. in Fluid Dynamics from Delft University of Technology, advised by Prof. J.A. Battjes). He has authored 1 book and over 40 peer-reviewed publications on a range of topics including rip-currents and surf zone exchange, modeling of beach morphology, larval transport from the inner shelf to the water line, bacterial loading of beaches, inlet and river observations and modeling. The combined modeling and observations approach has led to significant model development within open source models that can be used free of charge.

Juan M. Restrepo

Professor
Oregon State University
Department of Mathematics
restrepo@math.oregonstate.edu

Juan M. Restrepo, is the Group Leader of the Uncertainty Quantification Group at The University of Arizona, and a professor in the Mathematics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Physics Departments. His team has developed several methods for nonlinear/non-Gaussian data assimilation, and is presently working in collaboration with Profs. Arthur Mariano, Clint Dawson and Shankar Venkataramani on a data blending strategy, optimized for the GoM. In collaboration with J. McWilliams (UCLA), he developed a comprehensive and consistent oceanic wave/current interaction model applicable to GoM Coast dynamics, and is at work on expanding the model to handle oil slicks at large spatio-temporal scales. He has also published in acoustics, and in sedimentary dynamics. In scientific computing, he has contributed to wavelet/Galerkin techniques, ensemble bred vectors for sensitivity analysis, eigenvalue calculations, and computational aspects of variational data assimilation.

Brad Rosenheim

Assistant Professor
University of South Florida
College of Marine Science / Geological Oceanography
brosenheim@usf.edu

Brad Rosenheim is an Isotope Geochemist with expertise in Paleoceanography and carbon cycling. He specializes in isotopic measurement techniques, including ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon analysis, which is relevant to the CARTHE's efforts. He is currently an investigator on two NSF RAPID grants related to Gulf of Mexico oil spills. He also convened an oil spill symposium at a 2011 Geological Society of America meeting in New Orleans. Dr. Rosenheim is the director of Tulane's Stable Isotope Laboratory (SILT U) providing research experience for both undergraduate and graduate students.

Steven Rosenthal

Ph.D. Student
University of Arizona
Department of Mathematics
wrosenthal@math.arizona.edu


Edward Ryan

Senior Research Associate
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
eryan@rsmas.miami.edu

Edward H. Ryan has been on the research staff at RSMAS since 1992 working on numerous and diverse projects.

Fernande Saintilis

Team Manager, Sponsored Programs
University of Miami
Office of Research Administration
fsaintilis@rsmas.miami.edu

Fernande Saintilis is a Sponsored Programs Team Manager at the Office of Research Administration. Her responsibilities include submitting proposals to various agencies, reviewing contracts, managing principal investigators’ sponsored accounts, expenditure control, account reconciliation, and training. She manages two center grants – the CESU (Caribbean Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit) as well as the grant management of the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbons in the Environment (CARTHE) project.

Paul A. Schuler


Oil Spill Response Limited




Conor Smith

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Applied Marine Physics
sailguy23@gmail.com


Alexander Soloviev

Professor
Nova Southeastern University
Oceanographic Center
soloviev@nova.edu

Alexander Soloviev has 30 years of experience studying microstructure and turbulence in the upper ocean including a published monograph "The Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean".

Ashley Stroman

Master's Level Student
Florida State University
Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
stroman@ocean.fsu.edu


John R. Taylor

University Lecturer
University of Cambridge
Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
J.R.Taylor@damtp.cam.ac.uk

John Taylor is a University Lecturer in Oceanography in the Department of Applied Mathe- matics and Theoretical Physics, and Fellow of St. Johns College at the University of Cambridge. He was a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow at UCSD, an NSF Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT, and received the Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award from the American Physical Society.

Andrés E. Tejada-Martínez

Associate Professor
University of South Florida
Civil and Environmental Engineering
aetejada@usf.edu

Andres E. Tejada-Martinez is an Associate Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineer- ing at University of South Florida. Tejada-Martinez is a computational scientist, specializing in large-eddy simulations of turbulent mixing processes in the upper-ocean and the inner continental shelf. He is a recipient of an NSF CAREER Award.

Mary-Louise Timmermans

Assistant Professor
Yale University
Geology & Geophysics
mary-louise.timmermans@yale.edu

Mary-Louise Timmermans is an Assistant Professor at Yale University. Her principle re- search relates to the dynamics and variability of the Arctic Ocean, including a recent NSF-funded study to investigate the submesoscale flow field under sea ice. Dr. Timmermans is a U.S. dele- gate of the Marine Working Group of the International Arctic Science Committee, she leads the Arctic Ocean section in NOAA’s yearly Arctic Report Card, and she is a member of the National Research Council Ocean Studies Board Committee on Responding to Oil Spills in Arctic Marine Environments.

United States Naval Research Laboratory


Stennis Space Center
Ocean Dynamics and Prediction Branch


The NRL CARTHE team (Jacobs, Carrier, Coelho, Barron, Hogan, Spence, Ko, Yaremchuk, Shriver) led by Gregg Jacobs are also members of the NRL Ocean Dynamics and Prediction Branch, which has 35 federal employees and 30 contractors involved with 135 active projects competitively funded by the Navy, NOAA, NASA and other federal agencies. Led by Dr. Gregg Jacobs, the Branch has developed numerical codes for two widely used global ocean models (NCOM and HYCOM) including their data assimilation routines. NRL also conducted validation testing of all components of the operational global and high resolution nested ocean model systems run at Navy operational centers and scheduled to be run at NOAA operational centers. Collectively the NRL CARTHE team has published 184 papers on ocean dynamics, numerical models, data processing, data assimilation and forecast capabilities. All NRL team members are accustomed to working in an environment where a larger objective is being addressed by the group, with each member contributing a critical research component subject to strict time constraints. Gregg Jacobs is CARTHE's leader for all modeling activities.

Arnoldo Valle-Levinson

Professor
University of Florida
Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering
arnoldo@ufl.edu

Arnoldo Valle-Levinson is a Professor at the Civil and Coastal Engineering Department at the University of Florida. His work deals mainly with the study of estuarine and coastal hydrodynamics. Throughout his career, he has carried out observational studies on exchange processes in fjords as well as in temperate, subtropical, and tropical systems. His research combines observational, numerical and theoretical approaches to elucidate the effects of bathymetry on volume exchange at the mouth of estuaries, fjords and coastal lagoons. His research also considers the interplay among wind-induced, density-induced and tidally induced exchange processes between estuarine systems and the adjacent coastal ocean, as well as their potential impact on nutrient fluxes, harmful algae and ichthyoplankton transport. Arnoldo is a recipient of a CAREER award from the US National Science Foundation, a Fulbright Specialist Fellowship in Chile, a Gledden Fellowship from the University of Western Australia, a Fellowship from the Mexican Academy of Sciences, a Visiting Fellowship from the Chilean Science Foundation, a Visiting Professorship from Utrecht University, and a Fulbright Senior Fellowship in Spain. He was named Distinguished Professor by the Northern Catholic University of Chile and a Corresponding Member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. Arnoldo has worked extensively in several Latin-American countries, where he also teaches courses on estuarine and coastal hydrodynamics. He has more than 120 peer-reviewed publications and is serving as associate editor of Continental Shelf Research, Estuaries and Coasts, Ciencias Marinas, and the International Journal of Ocean System Engineering. Arnoldo’s contribution to CARTHE involves the manufacturing of 300 drifters that were used in the Grand Lagrangian Deployment Experiment. He also expects to contribute in some aspects of the data analysis and publication production.

Shankar Venkataramani

Associate Professor
University of Arizona
Department of Mathematics
shankar@math.arizona.edu

Shankar Venkataramani has extensive experience in applying rigorous mathematical methods to study complex, nonlinear, stochastic and high dimensional systems. In his work, he has developed multiple scale methods to study problems in Lagrangian transport, reaction-diffusion equations, nonlinear elasticity, pattern formation and geodynamics.

Shitao Wang

Ph.D. Student
University of Miami
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography
swang@rsmas.miami.edu


Samantha Wheeler

Undergraduate Student
University of Southern MIssissippi




Nicolas Wienders

Research Faculty
Florida State University
Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science
wienders@fsu.edu

Dr. Wienders is a research faculty at Florida State University and holds a PhD in physical oceanography. He is working with Dr. Bill Dewar on the production of a MITgcm package for the production of near-bottom oil transport simulations near the shelf. Together, they produced the new "CheapAML" package as part of the CLIMODE project. Dr. Wienders has also been involved in the DIMES project, which has taken him to Antarctica on various occasions. Aside from his involvement with CARTHE, Nico is a PI with the DEEP-C Consortium, where he heads the mooring and float experiments.

Ge-Cheng Zha

Professor
University of Miami
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
gzha@miami.edu

Ge-Cheng Zha is the Director of the Aerodynamics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Lab at the University of Miami. He has extensive experience in CFD algorithm and code development, turbulence simulations, fluid structural interactions, flow control, and aerodynamics and has authored 31 peer-reviewed publications to date.

Ping Zhu

Associate Professor
Florida International University
Department of Earth Sciences
zhup@fiu.edu

Ping Zhu is experienced in simulating atmospheric boundary layer turbulence and mixing processes in hurricane and non-hurricane conditions using large eddy simulations (LES). He has published 16 peer-reviewed papers on atmospheric boundary layer processes and hydrocarbon transport in the lower atmosphere. He recently published an innovative LES forecasting/hindcasting approach that can be nested in mesoscale models to simulate boundary layer transport in all weather conditions. Dr. Zhu was awarded an NSF Career Award and has organized two GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) evaluations.